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LeSean McCoy in talks with multiple teams on 2020 deal

The Pitt great averaged 4.6 yards per carry in Kansas City last season

NFL: Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports

Former Pitt running back LeSean McCoy won a Super Bowl ring as a member of the Kansas City Chiefs last season, but shortly thereafter, he became a free agent. Since then, McCoy’s NFL future has become unclear, as the 32-year-old has yet to sign with a team. However, on Friday, McCoy revealed that he was in talks with multiple teams about playing in 2020.

“You talk about that number,” McCoy told Mike Garafolo of NFL Network. “That number’s 12,000. That’s something I’ve always wanted to achieve. That’s big to me. Right now, just talked to a couple of teams – some of my favorite teams – that I’d think would be a great fit for me. I won’t tell you exactly, but I think the biggest thing is to find the right fit.”

“I think at this point in my career, it’s not just playing football,” he added. “I want to play for the right team. I want to be able to contribute. I want to be able to win another championship. You can’t go from playing with the Chiefs with all that talent and winning a championship to now just trying to play. I’m the type of guy, I want to come in a room, challenge the running backs, get them better, be a veteran leader. ... So just got to find the right fit for me.”

The renowned scatback has amassed 11,071 rushing yards during his 11-year career, which was split between stints in Philadelphia and Buffalo before McCoy’s reunion with ex-Eagles coach Andy Reid in Kansas City last year. However, despite his impressive career numbers, McCoy saw his role with the Chiefs diminish as the 2019 season wore on, and he did not end up playing in the Super Bowl.

With that said, McCoy still has much to offer potential suitors, as he led all Chiefs running backs in yards per carry, with 4.6, and ranked second on the team in rushing touchdowns, with four. And should McCoy accrue the 929 yards necessary to reach the 12,000-yard mark he spoke of, he may well punch his ticket to Canton, as no NFL running back who has retired with 12,000 career yards has been denied entry to the Hall of Fame.